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think you have to ask those questions. those are simple questions. it is not rocket science. i used to teach in american university. used to teach courses to cops and prosecutors. this is not rocket science. i don't know if aid should be rocket science. i have been impressed that some people have said we really need a designed program knowing where we are working. if we know we're working in the most corrupt country and the world, we design a program that protects the funding. i was very impressed with that. i have not seen a program with that bill 10. people tell me they are thinking about it. some the -- someone told me the norwegians do that but i have not run into many norwegians. yes, sir? you are norwegian? >> no. one thing i came away with is that the afghans are very good at running their own businesses but what we do as we create an incentive or by running a business is about profits. i have partnered with an afghan and several afghans' over there and we are trying to build infrastructure where afghans have a stake in the infrastructure itself rather than just jobs today an
, celeste ward gventer, thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
, celeste ward gventer thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
fill with mud and a very sophisticated science you can reconstruct environmental histories going back in time. this is the 1920s and 1800's and look at past pollution levels preserved in the archive like a history book in the bottom of a lake. >> say that pollution levels right now are low, but you think they're going to go up over time but it strikes me even in the example you were just talking about and in saying they're low you're comparing them to a pristine environment that was the wilderness but the level you're finding are lower than what we would find in most cities. >> right now, well these are wilderness lakes we should say. these lakes are anywhere from 30 kilometers or sorry, 60 miles to 60 miles away from the major source. you have to fly into the lakes typically with a helicopter or something. they're not right no the oil sand operation. what is i think important to say, if you look at our most polluted site, which is about 15 miles let's say approximately from the major operation, if you look at that, that current levels would find in a city. what is different in many c
science and evidence based drug and alcohol treatment center. where your addiction stops and your new life begins. call now. >>> our fifth story "outfront," shut out by the baseball hall of fame. barr bonds, roger clemens and sammy sosa, all of whom faced accusations of steroid use, were not inducted. only the eighth time that no new player was added. "outfront" tonight, tom berducci. he's the guy who made the decision. i spoke to him and asked him who he voted for. >> tom, sorry, i want to start with barry bonds. 762 home runs, more than anyone else ever. 1,196 rbis. in 2001, a record 73 home runs, more than anyone else ever. the only seven-time mvp in baseball. did you vote for him to join the hall of fame? >> i did not vote for him. it's funny you read off those numbers. i don't even need to know because he was this good. one of those you said that's a hall of famer. well, a hall of fame career, perhaps, but the choice he made to use performance enhancing drugs, to me, that does not define a hall of famer. >> roger clemens, 354 wins, 4, 672 strikeouts, the only seven-time cy young winne
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> our second story, another high profile woman steps aside. the president's secretary resigned, one of eight women and her resignation comes the same day an image caught our attention "the new york times." this shows, this is why i said the frame. like the frame of the picture. the president is meeting with his top advisers. now, valerie jarrett is in that picture. hold it up. do you see her? i see a lot of white guys, but if you take a closer look, you can see a portion of her leg, wow, really? whoever found that works hard. okay. there's that guy's butt and her leg. now, the picture was taken about two weeks ago, but shortly after the picture was published, this was the white house photo of the day. the president and his senior advisers. three women in the picture, all very visible. "outfront" tonight, charles blow and former pentagon official, rosa brooks. charles, let me start on this first hilda solis resigning. there's always a lot of turnover. there's one fewer woman in the cabinet.
of a magazine. "the times" that you read, monday, sports, wednesday, science, dining, thursday, home and style, friday, arts, saturday -- in new york, you get a special sports section, but the rest of the country does not. so what happens? "the times" did very well, in part, because of advertising. we are now in the period of the vietnam war. a lot of advertisers did not want to be on the same page as the vietcong, blood, gore. that is why we started with the normandy invasion. then it was kind to be on the same page because it was us against them. but here we have us against them and us against us. so these special sections that was a great advertising boom, they were short on content sometimes. in my book i used the term "the times" light. what happens, they would dummy down these sections. if you read the sections, sometimes you know, they are extremely prolific, and they have no point. there are some strong articles on alzheimer's and things like that, but there is also some stuff there that is a really soft. but this helped "the times" immeasurably. helped contribute to prosperity. rosend
. [applause] >> thank you very much, everyone, for coming. thank you to the department of political science. today, we have for pronounced -- we have for pamela spirit we will have a bit of discussion between them and then moved to audience discussion. first, deborah is the this -- is a professor of ethics and society. she is also the senior associate dean for the humanities. she is a member of the philosophy department and director for ethics and a society. her research focuses on the ethical limits of the markets. a place of equality in a just society and a rational choice. she also works on ethics and at the -- in education. she is co-editor of the forthcoming collection, occupy the future. he is a graduate of mit and an early participant in occupy washington -- occupy boston. he specializes in web applications and design. a co-founder in danger of some in cambridge. -- actually, just in central square. if he continues to be engaged in outspoken protests, malfeasance, and a finance industry mismanagement. and next is phil thompson. actually, he is on the end. an associate professor. i'm
finance minister of climate change science. financeok our former scienc minister around the world read only for started, he said humans were not responsible and was opposed to any action on climate change. we traveled for four weeks. i took into the u.s., the u.k. by the end, i got him to a point where he said, "climate change is happening and humans have probably cost part of it." i was able to convince him somewhat of the need to switch to renewable energy. we need to make these transitions right away toward wind and solar, clean energy, because if we don't, we are going to see more and more of these devastating extreme weather events that occurred not just australia, the people all around the world. >> anna rose, how sycophant is the position of the u.s. on climate change >> -- how significant is the position of u.s. on climate change? >> it is extremely significant countries like the street and around the world. the rest of the world has started to act around the world. the europe has been doing it for those big stepsad will not happen until we get the united states to put a price
's not rocket science. oversight investigation is not rocket science. i used to teach at american university and i used to teach a lot of courses to cops and prosecutors. this isn't rocket science, and i don't know of age if age should be rocket science. i am very impressed with some people i talk to at a.i.d. has said we really need to design programs knowing where we are working. if we know we are working in the most corrupt country in the world we designed a program that protects the funding. i was very impressed with that. now i haven't seen a program without built-in but people tell me they are thinking about it. somebody told me that her regions do that. yes, circ? >> previously i ran a team for operations under dod to afghanistan. one of the things that i came away with is that afghanistan, afghans are good at running their own businesses. but what we do is we create an incentive whereby running business is about short-term profit. so what we have didn't, is partner with afghan, several afghans over there and we are trying to build electricity infrastructure were afghans actually have
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. cheryl: what do you get when you mix judaism and beer brewing? well, according to the next guest, you get an american-jewish celebration beer. small business, big ideas, this is the best. founder of scmaltz brewers, called hebrew. what inspired you? >> well, hebrew beer is the first and only jewish celebration beer in the united states, high end craft beer marketed to the jewish community and anybody else who loves great beer. cheryl: all my jewish friends are wine drinkers, is there the population? >> yes, we get the question all the time. i thought jews didn't drink beer. that was going to be the bumper sticker in the beginning. we play with stereotypes, and it's important to have a wonderful high end craft beer to celebrate jewish tradition, the calendar, but, also, now craft beer is popular and growing we want to make beers to stand with the best craft beers. cheryl: sales impressive, 125,000 cases sold, $3.5 million in sales. that's not small, th
. >> we'll take a quick look. >> reporter: to what looked like a scene from a science fiction movie. >> believe it or not, these timbers washed in from the ocean or bay. >> this timber right here. >> absolutely. >> are this washed in -- >> all this debris you see washed in from the tidal surge. >> reporter: this station, the end of the line for the city's number one subway train, is called south ferry. three years ago it was brand new. built at a cost of more than half a billion dollars. now it's in ruins. sandy broke records for the biggest waves in new york harbor, for the biggest surge in new york city, and for the lowest pressure ever north of north carolina. what was the impactful part of sandy was the surge at 12, 15 feet. that surge had never been seen in new york city before. >> when we were here the water was just below this level. >> reporter: nearly a month after our first interview. >> you can see the rust. >> reporter: this time dressed in a suit and tie, he took us back underground. >> it wasn't a rebuilding as some of our other stations. that was a brand new tunnel st
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. ♪ ♪ we're lucky, it's not every day you find a companion as loyal as a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. ♪ oh monday morning ♪ you gave me no warning >>> quite frankly, chuck hagel is out of the mainstream of thinking, i believe, on most issues regarding foreign policy. i expect the president to nominate people different than i would think. i'm going to vote for senator kerry. i don't agree with him a lot, but i think he's very much in the mainstream of thought. chuck hagel, if confirmed to be secretary of defense, would be the most antagonistic secretary of defense toward the nation of israel in our nation's history. he has long severed his ties with the republican party. this is an in-your-face nomination by the president to all of us who are supportive of israel. >> chuck hagel was a republican senator from nebraska, a decorated veteran of the vietnam war, a person who has a resume that include
. but the key thing is he says science and technology could be a way to improve the economy. from what we've seen on our visits though,, both he and perhaps google's schmidt might have their work cut out for them. one of our earlier visits we were shown what appeared to be an internet center at a library. in fact it was a intranet center. the folks in north korea have almost no access to the real worldwide web and in our last visit, jon, we saw more mobile phones out in the streets but there is a hitch there too. these mobile phones can not connect outside of north korea. in fact they're more dumb than smartphones. however who knows. schmidt might have the idea to get a few more phones, google phones, google tablets google searches in north korea. jon: information wants to be free. greg palkot in london. thank you. jenna: it is a known fact that obesity is not good for your health but seems some risks get more attention than others. a new survey finding while most americans realize carrying too much pounds can contribute to heart disease and diabetes there are other series -- serious cons
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. i've been fortunate to win on golf's biggest stages. but when joint pain and stiffness from psoriatic arthritis hit, even the smallest things became difficult. i finally understood what serious joint pain is like. i talked to my rheumatologist and he prescribed enbrel. enbrel can help relieve pain, stiffness, and stop joint damage. enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region you should not start enbrel if you have an infection like the flu tell your doctor if you're prone to infections, haveuts or sores, have had hepatitis b, have been treated for heart failure, or if you have symptoms such as persistent fever, bruising, bleeding, or paleness. [ phil ] get back to the things that matter most. ask your rheumatologist if enb
science, farm law and more. 21-year-old adrian bradley means an ag degree means good pay even for entry level jobs. >> my best friend just started at $48,000 a year in agriculture in agribusiness. >> experts predict by 2050 the world's population will exceed 9 billion people. a sobering projection that calls for boosting global food production by 70%. agriculture leaders say today's current crop of ag students are driven by that challenge. in davis, california, claudia cowen, fox news. >> thousands of faithful christians filling the streets of ma tried, celebrating the traditional end to the christmas season. beautifully decorated floats, clowns and marching bands took to the parades. it is held to celebrate the story of the three wise men who are believed to have followed a star to arrive at the manger in legitimate -- bethlehem where jesus was born. >>> why is this man strapped to his chair at 35,000 feet with duct tape? details next. i'm done! "are you a cool mom?" i'm gonna find out. [ female announcer ] swiffer wetjet's pads are better than ever. now they have the scrubbing power o
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "morning joe." the co-founders of a small business, their 3-year-old small business on the rise growing at a rate of 200% each year. >> that's good. a good rate of growth. good to see you. first things first, a new father, paul. congratulations. new year's eve baby. >> seven minutes before the ball dropped. snow maybe there >> how much sleep have you gotten zblnt maybe there's a reason you're here and not with the baby. we want to bring you guys in, you have first such a great story in school together and also facing the headwinds a lot of people have faced the last few years with the economy and succeeding. paul, i start with you. how did you guys get together on this and why did you choose shirts? >> a great question. we weren't always shirt makers. we were in business school in 2007 in the uk and we were heading to world finance in 2007, seemed to be the direction to go. as luck would have it and life have it we graduated the da
, there are a lot of issues surrounding that. in the science areas is where we need to stay focused. whoever the president would like to survive his discretion, that is his call. i would not want to judge where he is going. we would seek to have a collation ship to based policy -- to have a good relationship to base policy. we have been having a good dialogue over the past couple months. we have areas we disagree on. we represent a broader industry that sometimes sees the world differently than a regulator. people the regulation should be thoughtful --we believe regulation should be thoughtful and based in science. >> we welcome the opportunity to work with whoever the president confirms and look forward to continuing the dialogue based on sound science and on tour philosophy or ideology >> thank you all for joining us. happy new year. >> thank you for being here today. thank you very much. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> the new congress is expected to debate the nation's immigration laws. we will talk to fa
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. you know it can be hard to lbreathe, and how that feels.e, copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva. discuss all medicines you take, even eye drops. stop taking spiriva and seek immediate medical help if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, vision changes or eye pain, or problems passing urine. other side effects include dry mouth and constipation. nothing can reverse copd. spiriva helps me breathe better. (blowing sound) ask your doctor about spiriva. >>> welcome back to "power lunch." here we have backed off rath
: lawrence is a professor of forensic science. cyanide is not easily detected on drug skreengs and a small amount can kill someone. >> it's usually kept under lock and key. again, if you work in the photographic industry, if you worked in a metal processing plant, or you worked in a plant with -- where they work with insecticides, those are places you would find cyanide. >> reporter: soits not all that difficult to obtain? >> it's not that difficult. if somebody wants to get it, they can get it. >> the only thing the chicago police would say on record is they are investigating khan's death as a murder and working closely with the medical examiner. as for the lottery check that had been mailed out, an official with the illinois lottery says records show that the check was cashed several weeks after khan's death. wolf? >> mary snow, thanks very much. >>> and you're in "the situation room." happening right now, tens and thousands of lives potentially at risk in what could be the worst flu season here in the united states in years. a leading doctor tells me, though, it's not too late to protec
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> "raw politics" now and a war of words breaking out over president obama's pick for secretary of defense. he's chuck hagel. >> chuck knows war is not a distraction. he understands that sending young americans to fight and bleed in the dirt and mud, that's something we only do when it's absolutely necessary. my frame of reference, he has said, is geared towards the guy at the bottom who is doing the fighting and the dying. >> senator hagel, though, may not have an easy confirmation. here is the reaction today from senator john mccain, a one-time political ally who once considered hagel as a running mate. quote. i have serious concerns about the positions senator hagel has taken on a range of critical issues in recent years which we will fully consider in the course of the confirmation process. he's talking about military action against iran, his willingness to consider cuts to the defense budget and most explosive perhaps past statements on the pro-israel lobby. >> i'm a united states senator, not an israeli senato
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> the horrific rape case that has sparked protest in india and outraged around the world moved closer to trial. the picture of the five suspects in the van was the only video from today. that's because there was so much chaos inside the courtroom, that a magistrate sealed the proceedings off. she also slapped a gag order on reporters. we'll have more on that in a moment. first, the rage of this attack is unleashed. it is important to talk about, and it is really extraordinary, the reaction. you have to keep in mind rape is very common in india. in 2011, there were more than 24,000 reported rapes. that's according to the national crime record's bureau. that's one rape every 22 minutes. those are only reported cases. experts say many more cases go unreported. the typical response, though, by authorities is actually to turn a blind eye or even blame the victim. not this time, apparently. here is randi kaye. >> reporter: we don't know her name, but we know her story inspired this, outrage. on december 1
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. it's part of what you slove about her.essing. but your erectile dysfunction - you know, that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as this may cause an unsafe drop in bloopressure. do not drink alcohol in excess with cialis. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or if you have any allergic reactions such as rash, hives,
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. a j2 >>> the roundtable coming right up. what's their take on the new congress? the late night comics have already had their first say. >> today members of the 113th congress today were sworn in at the capitol after which they were like, well, that's enough sport for the year. >> how many are in favor of this deal? [ applause ] how many against this deal? [ cheers and applause ] how many are happy you don't have to hear this stupid phrase "fiscal cliff" anymore? [ cheers and applause ] i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. my ex-girlfriend... 7th grade math teacher. who is this? that's pete. my... [ dennis' voice ] allstate agent. a "starving artist" has an allstate agent? he got me... [ dennis' voice ] the allstate value plan. it's their most affordable car insurance and you still get an agent. [ normal voice ] i call it... [ dennis' voice ] the protector. is that what you call it? the protector! okay. ♪ the allstate value plan. are you in good hands? >>> a long-time senator jay rockefeller of west virginia says he's going to retire when his term ends next year. that and that gives republicans a good chance, a great chance, to pick up a senate seat. rockefeller is one of the most senior senate democrats serving since 1984. in that time his state has shifted from deep blue to deep red. consider this, west virginia was reliably democratic in presidential elections voting for carter over reagan in 1980 and mike dukakis in '88. but since 2000 it's been solidly republican and president obama lost the state by 2
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> and we are back. attitudes may be changing, but the white house has a heavy lift on its hand when it comes to gun control. a task force led by vice president joe biden is looking to reinstate the assault weapons ban. and as the "washington post" reports, broader gun control measures are also on the table. regulations that would require universal background checks for firearm buyers, track the movement and sale of weapons through a national database, strengthen mental health checks and stiffen penalties for carrying guns near schools or giving them to minors. those proposals still under consideration are getting considerable pushback from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle. one fre
picture arts and sciences, and for us. he's welcome brian rose. rose.ase welcome brian [applause]next, we could not be more honored or delighted to have brooke gladstone with us tonight. she is the cohost of npr's "on the media." it also wrote a very entertaining book called "the influencing machine." we will be doing a signing of her book, it's just came out. she has been at npr for many years. including a three-year stint in moscow where she covered the last years of president boris yeltsin's term. i know that all of you diehard o the media" groupies will tell you that there is something about brooke that pulls you in. ira glass, host of this american life, put it right when he wrote, just like welcome gladwell, michael pollan, and michael lewis, brooke can take any subject, even something you do not give a damn about, and make it of interest. please welcome two-time peabody award winner brooke gladstone. [applause]>> thank you, catherine. thank you, brooke, for coming tonight. i would like to start with your book. you talk about a number of media biases. one of favorites is the narrat
in people going into forensic science and that -- that college programs couldn't go fast enough to put people through. he had watched that and realized as the f.b.i., he wanted to make being an f.b.i. agent cool. he was very supportive. >> it was a recruiting vehicle. >> it was a good recruiting vehicle and that was his interest in it. john miller, with ran public affairs with him for a long time and was, i think, like the deputy head, very -- a high-ranking public affairs guy, sort of come out of television, has gone back to television and understood it and there was, even with the best of intentions, there was enormous tension the whole way through. i said, you know, if we're going to do modern television that people are going to watch, it has too much character flaws. there was enormous negotiation over drinking, smoking, sex, what kind of sex, where and when and how and it just, they had the best of intentions, i was very direct with them going in. it's still, i would say that was the best experience. >> ultimately the show didn't work. >> it wasn't quite good enough, wasn't quite
to the customer through actuarial science and through claims management. our new role is to create an integrated delivery model driven by primary care providers that uses shared data at the point of care to improve outcomes, lower costs and create a better health care experience. at humana, our model integrates our delivery, data support for clip in additions -- clinicians and wellness and productivity platforms. and in many ways our motto is an evolution with its roots prevalent 20 or 30 years ago. but today simplicity is the key. we believe in integrated delivery model that emphasizes primary care can provide outcomes, lower the cost of care -- especially to patients with critical or complex medical needs, including patients in the medicare and medicaid program. the concept relies on primary care physicians to coordinate care for patients, helping them navigate the health care system so they can receive the right care at the right place at the right time. like many organizations and industries, technology plays such an important role in enabling this to happen. we are investing in today in dat
? >> reporter: his family donated his brain to science, the national institutes of health found evidence of hardened brain cells like these. telltale signs of chronic traumatic disease. >> all concurred with the diagnosis of cte. >> reporter: chronic blows to the head, including concussions, can cause cte. the symptoms include dementia, mood swings and depression severe enough to lead to suicide. >> the combination of depression and lack of impulse control probably contributes to the suicide we see in this group of individuals. >> reporter: researchers have documented 50 football players stricken by cte, 35 nfl players, 6 high school players. >> chronic traumatic encephlopathy is not being seen in individuals without repetitive head injury. >> reporter: this revelation has summoned the nfl, questioning their own health. >> at times i do forget things, the sleepless nights you may have, you start to wonder are you down that path towards cte? >> reporter: the seau family noticed his change in personality in the last years of his life. from outgoing, hard charging family leader, to withdraw
including it was an award from the american science association for the best book of political science. also a key facilitator of a summer security studies workshop that probably somewhere around 75 percent of all the security studies professors in the nation have attended. also a great deal of experience in the policy field, a senior fellow at the council on foreign relations where he served as director of national security studies, former staff member of the church committee and worked in the national security council and serve six years and a national security advisory panel for the cia director. most recently he was part of a task force of experts behind report entitled a new u.s. defense strategy for a new era. finally, and joined by paul wolfowitz, a scholar at the american enterprise institute with more than three decades of experience in public service and higher education and an incredibly wide variety of roles as president of the world bank, dean of the johns hopkins school of international studies, the state department director of policy planning in this is the secretary of state
them. host: a food safety attorney at the center for science in the public interest, sarah klein. we're talking about fda proposals for food safety rules. the numbers are there on the screen, along with the center's website. reach out to us via social media, twitter, and facebook. regarding the preventative food- processing part of this, what kind of verifications' is the fda going to lock on to the folks that are processing? guest: enforcement is always a big question for fda. the agency does not have the resources or manpower to do verification and inspection said everett facility. we've got thousands upon thousands of facilities in the u.s. and abroad. fda is looking at ways of involving the states and a cooperative effort. many of these businesses are already inspected by state health departments or state departments of agriculture. fda will bekia collaborative way with the states to ensure that everyone is being inspected, verified, audited up to the same standards. fda will not be on site during all the inspections themselves, as usda is, but it will have a much stronger hand i
judges, i think you have to ask those questions. those are simple questions. it is not rocket science. i used to teach in american university. used to teach courses to cops and prosecutors. this is not rocket science. i don't know if aid should be rocket science. i have been impressed that some people have said we really need a designed program knowing where we are working. if we know we're working in the most corrupt country and the world, we design a program that protects the funding. i was very impressed with that. [laughter] i have not seen a program with that bill 10. t in.ild people tell me they are thinking about it. some the -- someone told me the norwegians do that but i have not run into many norwegians. yes, sir? you are norwegian? >> no. one thing i came away with is that the afghans are very good at running their own businesses but what we do as we create an incentive or by running a business is about profits. i have partnered with an afghan and several afghans' over there and we are trying to build infrastructure where afghans have a stake in the infrastructure itself rathe
new science of support from teens who believe there is nothing to be ashamed of. for "good morning america," abbie boudreau, abc news, los angeles. >> thank you, abbie. >>> back now with barbara walters, bringing us the latest interview with ma ryey carey. so much going on with her. >> there's a lot. i'm not a hollywood reporter. i have known her for years. i will bring you up to date on this saga. okay. mariah expected to be the only female judge on "american idol." which starts itse 12th season. text thing she knew, nicki minaj was added as a judge. they had an argument. mariah said she felt threatened. i talked to her on the phone. i reported it on "the view." i went to her apartment for catchup. here we go. ♪ >> reporter: this is how we're used to seeing mariah carey. belting out her music with a voice of staggering power and range. ♪ you're my own everybody >> reporter: but starting next week, she will be judging the singers instead of being the singer. as a new member of "american idol." >> my personal, little tiny opinion. >> reporter: her star power didn't come cheap. t
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